Streetfilms: Good Riddance to Wasted Asphalt

Before Streetfilms were called Streetfilms, Clarence Eckerson and Streetsblog Publisher Mark Gorton identified Grand Street, with its expanse of asphalt forcing pedestrians to the margins, as a prime spot for space reclamation. Now home to a conniption-inducing parking-protected bike lane, check out this 2005 vid to see why Grand was due for a livable streets makeover.

Visit the old New York Streets Renaissance page for more goodies from the Streetfilms vault.

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With the 10-year benefit for Streetsblog and Streetfilms coming up on November 14 (get your tickets here!), we are counting down the 12 most influential Streetfilms of all time, as determined by Clarence Eckerson Jr. The Case for Physically Separated Bike Lanes Number of plays: 123,500 Publish date: February 17, 2007 Why is it here? Ten […]
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Streetfilms: Contraflow Bike Lanes — A Capital Idea

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While we were down in Washington, DC for the National Bike Summit, Streetfilms got the chance to check out some of the capital’s innovative new bike infrastructure. Tops on our list: the city’s first protected, contraflow lane for bicyclists. The district DOT has redesigned 15th Street NW between U Street and Massachusetts Avenue to accommodate […]

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With the 10-year benefit for Streetsblog and Streetfilms coming up on November 14 (get your tickets here!), we are counting down the 12 most influential Streetfilms of all time, as determined by Clarence Eckerson Jr. Complete Streets: It’s About More than Bike Lanes Number of plays: 53,500 Publish date: May 9, 2011 Why is it […]

Give to Streetsblog and Streetfilms and Enter to Win a New PUBLIC Bike

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As recently as 2007, there were no protected bike lanes in New York City, plans to enhance major bus routes were sitting on a shelf, and city transportation officials were still trying to do things like convert neighborhood commercial streets into high-speed traffic sewers. Streetsblog and Streetfilms helped change that. We raised expectations for our […]