Holiday Bonus for U.K. Ikea Employees: 9,000 Free Bikes

The Independent (UK) reports:

Ikea, the Swedish retail chain, showed its green credentials yesterday by giving all 9,000 of its UK workers a free bicycle.  The store handed out the £139 fold-up bike and offered a 15 per cent subsidy on public transport at its Christmas breakfast.

The bicycle is the store’s second high-profile green gesture this year following its decision to introduce a charge for plastic bags and encourage reusable ones. Plastic bag take-up at checkouts is down by 97 per cent.

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